Living Stone blog 3

 

 

All Posts

Social media and marketing: 5 golden rules

When you’re developing a B2B social media marketing plan, there are a few golden rules to remember. These rules of social media marketing aren’t carved in stone, but they provide some good suggestions for how to do social media marketing. There are also some differences when it comes to social media rules for business vs. B2C. (And if you want to learn more, you can download a checklist on Content Marketing Best Practices, for 5 easy-to-implement B2B content marketing tips, at the end of this page.)

  1. Always stick to your strategy

    Don’t just post content because you have it – ie. sales just created a sell sheet, or human resources sent you a link to a video from the off-site employee meeting. Instead, make sure all the content that you post supports your strategy and will help you reach your marketing goals.  While it’s nice to have a lot of online content, it won’t help you if it’s a mashup of questionable quality. You’ll end up confusing your target audiences, or worse, turning them off your product or company.
  2. Focus on the platforms that are relevant for you

    Don’t assume that you have to be on all of the top platforms. Do your research into LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Google+, Pinterest, Instagram, SnapChat, etc. Then see which platforms your competitors are on, and find out where your prospects are likely to be found. Then choose two or three platforms that make sense for your organization and product. Do you offer a “lifestyle” product or service? Instagram, Pinterest and Facebook may be a good mix for you. Manufacturing? Try LinkedIn and Twitter.
  3. Put someone in charge

    Remember back at the dawn of the internet, when companies put a contact email option on website, and then never replied to any incoming emails? If you’re active on social media today, it’s imperative to monitor and reply to all comments and queries. Especially since one of the end goals is to build interactive relationships with your prospects. If you can’t hire a dedicated online community manager, make sure you provide training to the individual who will look after your social media interactions, to ensure you’re able to hold up your end of the conversation.

  4. Strike the right balance between sharing too much and too little

    We all know an organization – or a person – who shares way too much on social media. But’s there’s also a danger in not sharing enough. You need to post enough to make yourself known and get your message across, but avoid over-exposure. How often you post depends on the platform, and on what you’re promoting. For a blog post, for example, the “unwritten rules” say you can post more frequently on Twitter than you can on Facebook or Google+. Monitor the frequency of other organizations’ posts, and keep a close eye on the responses to your posts to get a sense of what is seen as appropriate.

  5. Provide online content that’s helpful – don’t sell

    Your audiences want information that will help them – to solve a problem, to learn about a potential solution, to find out what their peers are doing, to discover what is new and exciting in their industry. Organize your content to match their informational needs – rather than organizing by your products or your company divisions.   

For social media help and if you want to learn more, download a checklist on Content Marketing Best Practices, for 5 easy-to-implement B2B content marketing tips, 

Download the checklist about B2B content marketing tips

 

Anne-Mie Vansteelant
Anne-Mie Vansteelant
COO | Managing Partner at Living Stone

Related Posts

How does communication contribute to the success of your hospital?

If you want your stakeholders to listen, you have to prove that your messages have value The perception that key stakeholders like referring physicians and patients have about your hospital is crucial. If it’s good, your stakeholders want to serve or be served by your hospital. On the other hand, if people hold a negative perception about your hospital, it can have an impact on everything from staff retention to patient volumes. A differentiated positioning sharpens the perception of the value of a hospital, increasing its attractiveness in the eyes of all audiences. So how can you boost the perception of your hospital? To answer this question, there are two key areas to explore: How can you develop a relationship with your target groups that is based on trust? And how can you become a reliable partner that people listen to?

Welcome to the “crib economy” – how marketing is changing in the Covid era

During the first lockdown, we looked forward to a quick return to normal. Now, the world has changed, and it seems we’re not going back to normal any time soon. Research shows that 75% of the population is still reluctant to engage in activities where contact with others is difficult to avoid – such as going in to the office, taking public transport, flights, carpooling, etc. Economists have introduced the term “crib economy,” meaning a lifestyle where we now all stay close to home.

What is the service concept of your hospital?

When you make your service orientation clear, everyone knows what to expect from your organization In the competitive hospital world, it’s important that all of your stakeholders – employees, patients, referring physicians, suppliers and others – know what your hospital stands for. Whether your service concept is ‘patient intimacy,’ ‘operational excellence’ or to be a ‘competence center of excellence,’ for example, all of your communications and activities must reinforce and support it.