Living Stone blog 3

 

 

All Posts

How to roll out your email marketing programs in healthcare

Even with new technologies, new platforms and new apps launching at warp speed, email marketing is still one of the most successful and cost-effective tools for healthcare marketers.

While it might not be as glamorous as Instagram, Facebook or even Snapchat, email retains a higher level of trust and authority, compared to social media. And it’s the preferred medium for healthcare professionals, who would rather receive information by email than via an in-person visit or a phone call. 

Email marketing has moved far beyond sending out a generic email blast.

To be successful, email programs need to be strategic, targeted and agile. They also need to be optimized for mobile. A recent survey of 1,200 people in the US showed that when an email displays incorrectly on mobile, more than 70% of recipients will immediately delete it. Just as an aside, the same study shows that teenagers are using email (73% of teens aged 14 – 18 use it for “everyday life”), so the idea that young people are abandoning email in favor of social media is not accurate.

» Download your free e-book on healthcare marketing «

So how can you ensure that your email marketing programs are hitting the mark? Keep these points in mind:

  • Send only information and offers that provide real value to your recipients. Don’t send emails that “might” be of interest.
  • Segment and target. Use your database effectively to tailor your emails to specific audiences.
  • Test your emails as you proceed, with different subject lines, CTAs, landing pages, and so on.
  • Keep your email copy short, and make sure to personalize everything you send out.

To learn more about these suggestions and find out more about strategic email marketing programs, check out The Guide to Healthcare Marketing, our comprehensive e-book for healthcare marketers, which covers email marketing and lots more.

Visit the Guide here, or contact Anne-Mie Vansteelant at Living Stone, at +32 55 591 007 or anne-mie.vansteelant@livingstone.eu, to find out how you can boost your email programs, zero in on your targets and increase marketing ROI.

Living-Stone-CTA-Blog (002)

 

Anne-Mie Vansteelant
Anne-Mie Vansteelant
COO | Managing Partner at Living Stone

Related Posts

How does communication contribute to the success of your hospital?

If you want your stakeholders to listen, you have to prove that your messages have value The perception that key stakeholders like referring physicians and patients have about your hospital is crucial. If it’s good, your stakeholders want to serve or be served by your hospital. On the other hand, if people hold a negative perception about your hospital, it can have an impact on everything from staff retention to patient volumes. A differentiated positioning sharpens the perception of the value of a hospital, increasing its attractiveness in the eyes of all audiences. So how can you boost the perception of your hospital? To answer this question, there are two key areas to explore: How can you develop a relationship with your target groups that is based on trust? And how can you become a reliable partner that people listen to?

Welcome to the “crib economy” – how marketing is changing in the Covid era

During the first lockdown, we looked forward to a quick return to normal. Now, the world has changed, and it seems we’re not going back to normal any time soon. Research shows that 75% of the population is still reluctant to engage in activities where contact with others is difficult to avoid – such as going in to the office, taking public transport, flights, carpooling, etc. Economists have introduced the term “crib economy,” meaning a lifestyle where we now all stay close to home.

What is the service concept of your hospital?

When you make your service orientation clear, everyone knows what to expect from your organization In the competitive hospital world, it’s important that all of your stakeholders – employees, patients, referring physicians, suppliers and others – know what your hospital stands for. Whether your service concept is ‘patient intimacy,’ ‘operational excellence’ or to be a ‘competence center of excellence,’ for example, all of your communications and activities must reinforce and support it.